Writing Summaries for Learning Journals

It may be useful to make a summary of the learning journal over the next couple of weeks. This can serve to help you finish off the project and to make it clear both yourself and the marker of the project what has been learnt from making the learning journal. Doing it now may help you look at the project in relation to the learning objectives and give you time to clarify anything that you may feel is unclear or needs teasing out. A summary that points the marker towards evidence which satisfies the learning objectives will help you think about what you have done and will help the markers of the project to maximise the marks given.

Both Moon (148:2006) and Francis (219:2009) suggest the writing of a summary or self assessment of the learning journal.

Moon suggests that you may write about the changes that the project went through, what worked and what didn't, inspiration, blocks and difficulties, advice you may have recieved along the way and ideas you have for future development. She makes the point that the summary is about reflecting on your self and your work whilst presenting a professional view to somebody else. Francis also has more informal ideas to aid reflection for a summary including drawing timelines and maps of how it went rather than how you hoped it would go.

What I find useful is to cut these out the learning objectives of the module that I have undertaken or the aims of the project I have been researching and glue them onto a large piece of paper Then I diagram around these labels to see where the book I have made meets the targets. I 'map' the learning objectives onto the project. This can help target any extra work I might have to do to make the acheivement of the targets clearer.

It may also help to show the journal to a 'critical friend' to see what they think.

Dom, Ray, Graham and I hope you have enjoyed the project and that you have continued to enjoy making learning journals for your professional and personal projects

Good luck.

Paul

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